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Courses for First Year Students – Fall Term 2013

The complete BSC College Catalog is available here.

Index:

 

Foreign Languages

ARB 101 Elementary Arabic I (1)
An introduction to the sounds and structure of Arabic language and its varieties (formal and colloquial), as well as to the culture of Arabic-speaking peoples. Skills emphasized are reading, writing, speaking, and oral comprehension.

ARB 102 Elementary Arabic II (1)
A continuation of ARB 101 with special focus on mastering basic communication skills as well as addressing the different cultural aspects of the Arabic-speaking world. Prerequisite: Consent.

CHN 101 Elementary Mandarin Chinese I (1)
An introduction to the Mandarin Chinese language in its five aspects: speaking, listening, reading, writing, and culture. Designed for students who have no prior knowledge of Chinese.

CHN 220 Intermediate Chinese I (1)
Building on beginning Chinese, this course reviews basic grammar and pronunciation concepts, builds vocabulary, and further develops all four language skills. Prerequisites: consent.

CHN 290 Chinese for the Workplace (1)
this course focuses on vocabulary and content specific to a particular profession (such as business or health care). Prerequisites: Consent.

LA 101 Elementary Latin I (1)
An introduction to the basic forms and grammar of classical Latin. The first semester emphasizes the forms of nouns and verbs and their use in simple sentences and clauses.

SN 101 Elementary Spanish I (1)
An introduction to the sounds and structure of the language as well as to the culture of Hispanic peoples. Skills emphasized are reading, writing, speaking, and oral comprehension. Designed for students who have no prior knowledge of Spanish. Prerequisite: consent and completion of the Spanish Placement Exam.

SN 201 Fundamentals of Spanish Grammar (1)
A review of the fundamentals of grammar designed primarily for students who have had only one or two years of language on the high school level. Prerequisite: consent and completion of the Spanish Placement Exam.

SN 220 Intermediate Spanish (1)
Building on beginning Spanish, this course thoroughly reviews basic grammar concepts, builds vocabulary, and further develops all four language skills. Prerequisite: consent and completion of the Spanish Placement Exam.

SN 221 Intensive Spanish (2)
Accelerated Spanish course focusing on the review of the fundamentals of Spanish grammar, building vocabulary, and developing all four language skills. Students will work at a high pace and high intensity level to complete two semesters of work in one semester. Prerequisites: consent and completion of the Spanish Placement Exam.

SN 270 Tertulia española (1)
Instruction and practice in oral comprehension and speaking. Conversation is based on realia (newspapers, magazines, videos). The course emphasizes oral proficiency and awareness of modern culture. Prerequisite: consent and completion of the Spanish Placement Exam.

SN 290 Spanish for the Workplace (1)
A course focusing on vocabulary and content specific to a health related professions. Prerequisite: consent and completion of the Spanish Placement Exam.

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Accounting

AC 221Accounting I (1 unit – equivalent to 4 semester hours)
An introductory study of financial statements analysis and accounting principles and techniques.

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Asian Studies

AN 150 Introduction to Chinese Culture(1) – GP
A survey of Chinese culture, taught in English. The course provides students with a better understanding of the Chinese people and culture, and prepares students to meet the challenges of the twenty-first century. Topics include geography, business, politics, philosophy, religion, art, music, film, medicine, food, family, and history.

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Art

AR 111 Two-Dimensional Design (1) – CE
A studio course emphasizing structural and proportional organization through problems in line, tonal contrast, and color relationship, employing a variety of materials.

AR 150 Drawing I (1) – CE
A studio course dealing with basic principles of drawing. This course emphasizes drawing skills and perception.

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Art History

ARH 215 Introduction to Art History: Ancient to Medieval (1) – GP
A digital-slide-lecture course that provides the general student as well as the art major with an introduction to the language and methodology of art history. Focus is placed on stylistic development and its relation to cultural and historical contexts. Objects studied include prehistoric cave paintings, Egyptian pyramids, ancient Greek sculpture, and the cathedrals of medieval Europe.

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Business

BA 201 The Real “Bottom Line”: Foundations of Business Thought (1) – ES
An examination of classic and contemporary literature in order to explore perceptions and opinions about business and the role individuals play in business organizations. The course reviews the evolution of thought on the organizational structure of business enterprises. In particular, it considers objectives of business beyond profitability: that is, more than the "bottom line."

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Biology

BI 115 Organismal Biology (1) – SM
An introduction to the biology of organisms. Topics include levels of biological organization, biological diversity, plant and animal structure and function, and comparative study of structure function relationships in living organisms. Designed for students who plan to major in biology or one of the natural sciences and/or who are pre-health.

BI 125 Cellular and Molecular Biology (1) – SM
An investigation of the fundamental properties of cells. Topics include cell structure and function, energetics and metabolism, gene structure and expression, and the techniques used to study these phenomena. Designed for students who plan to major in biology or one of the natural sciences and/or who are pre-health.

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Chemistry

CH 110 Chemistry Skills (½)
An introduction to the fundamental skills in chemistry including terminology, stoichiometry, balancing chemical equations, classifying reactions, and gas laws. This course is designed for students who need to improve their background in chemistry before taking General Chemistry.

CH 120 General Chemistry (1) – SM
A study of atomic theory, chemical bonding, periodic trends, molecular shapes, thermodynamics, kinetics, and equilibrium. Prerequisite: Passing score on the Chemistry Placement Exam.

CH 149 Chemical Principles (1) – ES
A one-semester course covering advanced topics in atomic theory, equilibria, thermodynamics, and kinetics, as well as an introduction to organic and biochemistry. Prerequisite: AP Chemistry Score of 4 or placement.

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Classics

CL 301 Greek Civilization (1)
A survey of the history, literature, and art of the Greeks from their beginning to Alexander the Great.

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Computer Science

CS 170 Introduction to Computing (1)
An introduction to the field of computer science. Topics include computing concepts and terminology. A major part of this course is problem solving and algorithm development using a programming language such as Pascal, Java, or C++.

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Dance

DA 101 Basic Ballet (½)
A study of the basic principles and techniques of classical ballet.

DA 102 Jazz Dance (¼)
A course in the basic elements of jazz dance for the non-major.

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Economics

EC 201 Principles of Macroeconomics (1) – CI
A general introduction to economics with emphasis on macroeconomic aspects: national income determination, monetary and fiscal policy.

EC 202 Principles of Microeconomics (1) – IA
A general introduction to economics with emphasis on microeconomic aspects: the economic principles underlying price, production, distribution of income, and related problems.

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Education and Educational Psychology

ED 201 Introduction to Education (1) – ES
This course provides an overview of American Education in both public and private settings. Students consider multiple aspects of education, including teaching as a profession, historical foundations of education, philosophical foundations of education, trends and issues in schools and teaching, issues of diversity and multicultural education, and the future of education. In addition, numerous social (quality of life) issues of importance to teachers, students and society in general are addressed.

EPY 223 The Developing Child in the Twenty-first Century (1)
Theories of child development to help students understand the mental, social, and emotional patterns of development from preschool through adolescence. Students will engage in discussions about how phenomena unique to the culture of the United States in the twenty-first century affect development and learning.

EPY 260 Survey of Exceptional Children (1) – CI
The role and scope of educational programs for exceptional children including etiology, identification, and incidence. An overview of how individualized programs are developed and planned is also included.

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English

EH 102 Seminar in Critical Thinking and Writing (1)
A seminar on college-level writing and critical inquiry. The course emphasizes clear and engaging prose, persuasive reasoning, various rhetorical strategies, research documentation, and standard English grammar and mechanics.

EH 160 America in the 1960s (1) – ES
An exploration of American culture in the 1960s, focusing on literary texts but supplemented by the music, films, and political documents of the decade. Throughout the term, students evaluate the legacy of the 1960s by identifying ways in which it is still with us today. As students hone their analytical skills, they will decide if they can, indeed, trust anyone over thirty.

EH 200 Introduction to Literature (1) – IA
Critical approaches to poetry, short stories, and drama. Prerequisite: AP English Grammar Score of 5.

EH 204 Writing for the Print Media (1)
A survey of writing styles and techniques appropriate for news writing, public affairs reporting, and feature articles for print, broadcast, and Internet media. Prerequisite: AP English Grammar Score of 5.

EH 208 Intermediate Writing (1)
The development of intensive analytical skills, precise and extensive vocabulary, and consciousness of style. Prerequisite: AP English Grammar Score of 5 or placement by English faculty.

EH 210 Introduction to Fiction (1) – IA
An introduction to the short story, in American, British, and world literature, with some attention to longer fiction. Prerequisite: AP English Grammar Score of 5.

EH 226 The Tranquillized Fifties: American 1950s Literature and Culture (1)—IA
An introduction to the culture and concerns of 1950s postwar America through study of the decade’s literature. This course examines poetry, prose, and drama which foregrounds the flux of personal, public, and national identity during a decade often assumed calm and tranquil. Students will investigate shifting attitudes toward racial and gender roles, newly emergent political ideologies, and other challenges to fifties’ conformity. Revealing individual, cultural, and social change, we will study the literary and cultural movements captured in the work of J.D. Salinger, Robert Lowell, Allen Ginsberg, Ralph Ellison, Tennessee Williams, Jack Kerouac, and Sylvia Plath.

EH 228 Ourselves and Others: Gender, Race, and Class in Literature (1) – ES
An introduction to the study of literature through reading, discussion, and community service. Students examine works of fiction, poetry, and drama that wrestle with differences of gender, race, and socio-economic class that have the capacity to divide us as well as enrich our perspectives. Fifteen hours of community service tutoring at local after-school programs and providing meals and conversation to women and children at a local shelter creates a powerful connection between literary study and the lives of our neighbors.

EH 250 Survey of British Literature (1)
An introduction to major British prose and verse written from the Anglo-Saxon period to the present. Prerequisite: AP English Grammar Score of 5.
Gender and Women Studies

GWS 200 Introduction Gender and Women Studies (1)
An introduction to the concepts and issues concerning the field of gender and women studies. By nature, this introductory course takes an interdisciplinary approach to explore topics relating to the field of gender and women studies. Placed within a historical and contemporary context, students examine topics ranging from feminist philosophy, gender roles and stereotypes, gender development, sexuality and relationships, sexual identity, workplace issues, legal challenges, women in media, violence against women, and global feminism.

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History

HI 103 European Civilization II (1) – CI
The historical development of European social and political attitudes and institutions from the French Revolution to the late twentieth century.

HI 151 History of the American People I (1) – IA
The evolution of the American people to 1865, as reflected in their political and economic development, social practices, and philosophy with particular reference to the interaction between ideas and social structure.

HI 152 History of the American People II (1) – IA
A continuation of History of the American People I, dealing with the changes in American society since 1865 as reflected in the industrialization of the nation with emphasis on the interaction between traditional concepts and contemporary social structure.

HI 181 East Asian Civilization I: Introduction to Chinese Civilization (1) – GP
A comprehensive introduction to the history of Chinese civilization from its beginnings to the seventeenth century. Key topics include the formation of ancient Chinese civilization, the growth and development of the three main traditions of learning and religion (Confucianism, Daoism and Buddhism), the evolution of China's imperial system of government, patterns of land tenure, the development of commercialized agriculture and urban centers, and the ways in which Chinese historians have written about their national past.

HI 206 The New South (1)
The evolution of the American South from the end of the Civil War to the present with emphasis on the political and economic transformations, cultural expressions, and shifting social relations, with particular attention to the Civil Rights movement.

HI 241 Monarchs, Rebellion, and Empire: History of England from the Anglo‑Saxons to George III (1)
A survey of the political, social, economic, and constitutional history of England and the British Empire to 1789. Among the many subjects examined are the Anglo‑Saxons, the Norman Conquest, the Wars of the Roses, Henry VIII and the English Reformation, Elizabeth I and the defeat of the Spanish Armada, the English Civil War, the Restoration, the establishment of the “first” British Empire, and the responses to the American and French Revolutions. Lectures are supplemented by audio‑visuals to add further context.

HI 245 Russian Civilization (1) – GP or IA
An introduction to the history of Russia and its distinctive political, social, and cultural institutions and expressions, from the formation of Rus in the first millennium of the common era through the breakup of the Soviet Union (a Leadership Studies designated course).

HI 282 Disputers of the Dao: Major Texts in the Confucian, Buddhist, and Daoist Traditions in East Asia (1) – GP or IA
The historical development of the major philosophical and religious traditions of East Asia (Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism) taught through the reading of a selection of their fundamental texts. The focus will be the texts, the major doctrines and schools of these traditions, and the patterns of their historical development in China, India, Japan, and Korea. Also listed as HON 282, this course may be counted by Honors Program students toward fulfillment of their course requirements. Prerequisite: at least one year of college coursework.

HI 284 Modern Japan (1)
An introduction to Japanese history from the emergence of military rule in the thirteenth century to the post‑World War II democratic experience. Emphasis is on the changing social, economic, and political structure of Japanese society and how the Japanese explained to themselves the changes taking place in their society.

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Harrison Honors Program Courses – Open to Harrison Scholars

HON 120 History of Terrorism (1) – ES
An examination of the history of terrorism with the twin goals of explaining its contemporary prevalence and its historical significance. Emphasis will be placed on the political, social, and cultural contexts of terrorism and political violence; critical, literary, and popular responses to terrorism; changing definitions of terrorism; and the interrelationship between terrorism and modernity. Particular attention will be paid to revolutionary terrorism in Europe and Russia in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries; ethno-nationalist terrorism in Europe, the Middle East, and North Africa in the second-half of the twentieth century; anti-imperialists and left-wing terrorism in the 1960s and 1970s; and the recent upsurge in religiously inspired terrorism. Prerequisite: Harrison Honors Program.

HON 224 Crucible Steel: Creative Expression and Human Rights (1) – CE
A course in artistic responses to human right events. The course’s focus may be one of any topic of inquiry into issues of Human Rights and related creative responses, such as “Birmingham 1963 and Now” and creative writing. Harrison Scholars may enroll in the course a second time if the subject matter and creative discipline is different. Prerequisite: Harrison Honors Program.

HON 225 Creativity: Person, Process, Place (1) – IA
A seminar that reviews and critiques current psychological theory and research on the creative process in all fields and related questions about the assessment and interpretation of creative products. Students will reflect on their own creative process, comparing their experiences to specific scientists and artists. Topics include creative problem solving, origins of cognitive and behavioral traits of creative individuals, and social, historical, and physical contexts conducive to creativity. Prerequisite: Harrison Honors Program.

HON 233 W.E.B DuBois and American History (1) – ES
An introduction to the life and thought of one of America’s foremost public intellectuals, W. E. B. Du Bois. Students will cover essential facts about Du Bois’ life and work and be able to situate his arguments and their significance in the broader currents of American history. Prerequisite: Harrison Honors Program.

HON 250 History of Documentary Film (1) – GP or IA
An introductory survey of documentary film. The course will focus on some of the major developments in documentary practice, while also considering a number of theoretical issues in the documentary tradition, including the problem of objectivity, the relationship between the documentary image and reality, and the mixing of fiction and non-fiction modes. The goals of this course are to introduce students to the important historical trends and concepts and to help develop the critical and analytical skills needed to understand the structure, style, and rhetorical strategies of documentary film (a Leadership Studies designated course). Prerequisite: Harrison Honors Program.

HON 282 Disputers of the Dao: Major Texts in the Confucian, Buddhist, and Daoist Traditions in East Asia (1) GP or IA
The historical development of the major philosophical and religious traditions of East Asia (Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism) taught through the reading of a selection of their fundamental texts. The focus will be the texts, the major doctrines and schools of these traditions, and the patterns of their historical development in China, India, Japan, and Korea. Prerequisite: Harrison Honors Program.

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Humanities

HM 120 How Language Works (1) – ES
An investigation into human language. This course introduces students to linguistics, the scientific study of language. Topics include language and society, language acquisition, pragmatics, syntax, semantics, phonology, and related issues.

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International Studies

IS 100 Introduction to International Studies (1) – GP
An introduction to a range of international studies topics including culture and communication, economics and politics, health, migration and population.

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Mathematics

MA 124 Pre-Calculus Mathematics (1)
A preparation for students who plan to study calculus. This course focuses on modeling realworld phenomena using polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. An understanding of these functions is developed graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. Not open to students who have an AP Calculus AB Score of 4 or 5.

MA 231 Calculus I (1)– QA
A course in calculus emphasizing graphical, numerical, analytical, and descriptive points of view. Topics include functions, derivatives, definite integrals, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. A primary learning objective is a working knowledge of differentiation. Not open to students who have an AP Calculus BC Score of 4 or 5.

MA 232 Calculus II (1) – QA
A continuation of Calculus I. This course continues to emphasize graphical, numerical, analytical, and descriptive points of view. Topics include definite integrals, approximation techniques, indefinite integrals, elementary differential equations, modeling, Taylor polynomials, and infinite series. A working knowledge of differentiation is assumed. Prerequisite: AP Calculus AB Score of 4 or 5.

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Media and Film Studies

MFS 100 Introduction to Media Studies (1)
An introduction to critical analysis of mass media in the context of contemporary culture and social institutions, including an examination of how mass media, such as film, television, advertising, the Internet, and others, affect and reflect cultural values, political attitudes, personal identity, and behavior. Students learn basic media literacy by developing conceptual tools for thinking critically about mass media, with a special emphasis on (1) how various media shape and convey meaning; and (2) the impact that the form, function, and institutional production of media have on local, national, and global communities.

MFS 210 Film Analysis (1) – IA
An introduction to the fundamental concepts and tools of film analysis. The course focuses on learning to isolate, describe, and analyze stylistic elements of film, as well as film narrative and narration. This course serves two purposes: to provide the necessary descriptive and analytic tools to excel in upper-level film courses; and to deepen the student's appreciation of cinema by encouraging the viewing of films as richly textured works of art.

MFS 222 Screenwriting (1) – CE
An examination of screenwriting using classical narrative structure. The course focuses on conventional storytelling elements like goals, conflicts, development, and resolution and how these are employed to clearly tell a story, engage the viewers’ attention, and elicit emotions from the audience. There will be an emphasis on using classical storytelling devices in a coherent and creative manner.

MFS 250 History Documentary Film (1) – GP or IA
An introductory survey of documentary film. The course will focus on some of the major developments in documentary practice, while also considering a number of theoretical issues in the documentary tradition, including the problem of objectivity, the relationship between the documentary image and reality, and the mixing of fiction and non-fiction modes. The goals of this course are to introduce students to the important historical trends and concepts and to help develop the critical and analytical skills needed to understand the structure, style, and rhetorical strategies of documentary film (a Leadership Studies designated course).

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Private Music Lessons

MS 100 Level Private ½ Hour Lessons (¼)
An introduction to the an instrument for non-majors and for music majors who need to develop basic skills. Emphasis is on development of applied skills and understanding of fundamental music concepts. Additional fee.

MS 300 Level Private One Hour Lessons (½)
One-half hour weekly of private instruction. A minimum of five hours of practice a week is required. These courses are either electives or secondary instruments for all music degrees and programs. MS 100-level courses cannot count as credit for the principal instrument requirement for any music degree or minor in music. Students enrolled in these courses are required to attend performance and repertoire courses. Additional fee.

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Music

MU 112 Southern Chorale (¼)
A mixed-voice chorus for students who wish the experience of concerted singing.

MU 113 Chamber Orchestra (¼)
An orchestral ensemble performance opportunity. Students rehearse and perform with the Red Mountain Chamber Orchestra (in residence at the College) or other approved orchestral ensemble.

MU 121 Introduction to Music (1) – GP
An introductory-level survey of music literature. This course introduces fundamental musical concepts and offers a survey of American vernacular music, music of selected world cultures, and standard repertory of western art music. Development of listening skills is emphasized.

MU 126 Music of the World's People (1) – GP
An introductory-level survey of cultures and music outside the tradition of Western European art music.

MU 151 Elementary Theory (1)
Notation, scales, and keys; cadence patterns, chord classification, and basic harmonic progressions; four voiced writing using triads and the dominant seventh chord and their inversions. Three one-hour lecture classes and two weekly lab sessions focusing on appropriate elementary aural skills. Prerequisite: Consent.

MU 158 Music Technology (1)
An introduction to music technology, which covers computer notation, recording techniques, MIDI sequencing, and file storage as related to music, and other techniques.

MU 211 Concert Choir (¼)
A mixed ensemble that gives at least one performance of a major choral work each term, and tours annually.

MU 215 Marching and Symphonic Band (¼)
Large instrumental ensemble for the performance of music for wind ensemble and similar groups.

MU 217 Jazz Band (¼)
An instrumental ensemble performing music for the dance orchestra and other popular styles.

MU 242 Opera Workshop (¼) – CE
The study and performance of operas and excerpts from operatic literature.

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Philosophy

PL 200 Ethical Choice (1) – CI
A beginning level course about moral decision making. Part of the course focuses on case studies of ethical choices pertaining to property, welfare, violence, punishment, war, and similar topics. The other part of the course is an introduction to ethical theory focusing on the processes by which moral norms are established and critically evaluated.

PL 201 Introduction to Philosophy (1) – IA
Basic problems and forms of inquiry that have shaped the Western philosophical heritage. The course may focus on problems of morality, religion, political philosophy, and theories about the nature and limits of human knowledge.

PL 207 Human Destiny (1) – ES
An investigation into differing philosophical accounts of human existence and the idea of destiny. The aim is to discover ways we might respond to enduring philosophic questions concerning human destiny within a multicultural context. Topics include the meaning of life, the relationships between soul and body, death and value, anthropocentrism and teleology, gnosis and salvation, science and religion, freedom and prediction, et al.

PL 251 History of Western Philosophy I (1) – IA
Ancient philosophy from Thales to Plotinus.

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Physics

PH 121 General Physics I (1) – SM
Mechanics of linear and rotational motion, oscillations, and waves, using vectors and calculus. The sequence PH 121‑122 fulfills the requirements of students who are majoring in physics, chemistry, or mathematics. This sequence is a prerequisite for all physics courses of higher number. Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. Tutorial sessions are offered each week. Prerequisite: credit in or current enrollment in MA 231.

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Political Science

PS 101 Introduction to American Government and Politics (1) – CI
A survey of research on the institutions of American government–the Presidency, the Congress, and the Supreme Court–and on political behavior at the mass, elite, and organizational levels. Questions of democratic theory are applied to the American context.

PS 111 Humor and the Cynical Political Mind (1) – ES
Examines politics and political issues through the perspective of humor, satire, and parody. The significance and impact of humor on the political process and on political knowledge will be explored, and a variety of humorous forms will be analyzed, including editorial cartoons, comic strips, late night television, situation comedies, radio talk shows, movies, and books. An emphasis will be placed on politics in the United States.

PS 235 Introduction to International Relations (1) – GP
An introduction to the study of international relations focusing on interactions of post-Cold War international systems and actors.

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Psychology

PY 101 Introduction to Psychology (1)
An introduction to the research, theory, and methods of psychological science.

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Religion

RE 205 Hebrew Bible (1) – IA
A study of the history and literature of the Hebrew Bible, or Old Testament. The course locates the Hebrew Bible in its historical context in the ancient Near East and explores the new ways of thinking about sacred texts that have emerged in modern biblical studies. A discussion-rich course, students will be equipped to enter into discussion with Jewish and Christian interpreters who wrestle with the political, ideological, and theological implications of these texts, both in the ancient world and in modern settings.

RE 222 Religions of Asia (1) – GP
A survey of the major religious traditions of Asia including Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism, Confucianism, Daoism, and Shinto. This course explores the major concepts, doctrines, and practices of each tradition in historical perspective. Emphasis will be placed on the examination of cross cultural religious categories within each, such as salvation, ritual, gender, or ecology.

RE 231 Popular and Folk Religion (1)
An examination of popular and folk religions—beliefs and practices that exist among the people, apart from and alongside the theological and liturgical forms of mainline religion.

RE 235 The Abrahamic Faiths: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam (1) – ES
A study of the three major religious traditions—Judaism, Christianity, and Islam—that trace their historical and theological roots to one figure: Abraham. The objective of this course is to explore the interconnection of these traditions, a historical and theological entwinement that is vital for understanding the modern world situation.

RE 275 Buddhism (1) – GP
A study of the Buddhist traditions from the life of Buddha to modern times. The course explores the doctrines and practices of Buddhist traditions in historical and geographic context. Emphasis is placed on the how the study of Buddhism in historical context contributes to our understanding of cross-cultural categories in the study of religion as well as the concept of “religion” itself.

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Sociology

SO 102 Contemporary Social Problems (1) – CI
The application of sociological principles and perspectives in the analysis of current issues. The impact of social change, deviations from norms, and conflicts between social structures and social goals and values are considered in relation to social problems.

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Theatre

THA 111 Make-up (1) – CE
Basic techniques in application of stage make-up for the performing arts. Prerequisite: consent.

ThA 120 Beginning Acting (1) – ES or CE
An introduction to the craft of acting, including focus on clarity and creativity in communication and performance skills, and the development of character analysis skills. The course reflects a "learning by doing," "hands on" approach.

ThA 201 Theatre Practicum (½)
Practical experience in performance or technical areas of theatre by participation in College Theatre productions. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent.

ThA 210 Technical Workshop (1)
A practical course in the technical aspects of theatre.

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Urban Environmental Studies

UES 150 Introduction to Environmental Studies (1) – SM
An interdisciplinary introduction to the complexities of environmental problems. The course provides an overview of scientific knowledge on ecology and environmental management and examines political, economic, and ethical issues involved in the attainment of a sustainable future. The course explores how an understanding of the natural and social sciences is necessary to address and solve environmental problems. Selected topics, including population growth, food shortages, pollution containment, and energy resources, are addressed.

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Physical Activity Courses

ED 121 Strength Training (¼)
Provides students the opportunity to acquire knowledge and skill in weight training. Students benefit t from increased fitness in the areas of cardiovascular, neuro-muscular coordination, balance, flexibility, muscular endurance, and overall improved muscle tone. This course may not be repeated for credit. Student athletes may not take for credit.

ED 128 Racquetball (¼)
Introduces racquetball as a lifetime sport and wellness activity. Students will learn the basic skills, rules, and etiquette of playing the game.

ED 129 Basketball (¼)
Provides students an opportunity to develop the basic skills and fundamentals of basketball. Students will learn the rules of the game as well as terminology and strategies. Not open to members of the men’s and women’s basketball teams.

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