Page 36 - Student Organizations Manual

MEMBERS
Know group goals and choose them
Serve those they represent
Work constantly
Give reports
Collect and bring ideas to meetings.
Before theMeeting:
Review the agenda
Se sure all needed materials are ready
Arrive on time
During theMeeting:
Help the group set the order of events
Listen attentively, respectfully, and participate
Help keep the group on the subject
Take notes to help recall information later
Help keep the group to its time limits for each item
Use written motions so everyone may have a copy
Be sure everyone has a chance to talk
Keep asking: Did we reach our goals for the meeting? Did we use our people and ma-
terials well? Did we waste time “trying to solve the impossible?
After theMeeting:
Read the distributed copies of the minutes
Make a report to those you represent as soon as possible
Write down important ideas and reactions to bring to the next meeting.
The plans are all laid out. The group members have arrived. What skills do you need
to conduct your meetings with style and effectiveness?
CONDUCTINGAMEETING
People say, ‘So many meetings, no results,” but no, that’s not the point. Having so
many meetings gives you comfort with each other and you are able to exchange
views frankly, you are able to know each other better.”
Sellapan Ramathan, president of Singapore
Good planning is essential for an effective meeting, but it’s only the first step. What
happens during the actual meeting is just as important. Here are some characteristics
of a good meeting in process:
The purpose of the meeting is clearly communicated
Only items that can be handled in the time allowed for the meeting are on the
agenda.
Someone is recording the ideas presented and decisions made and will get copies
of those notes to everyone after the meeting.
No single person dominates the meeting; everyone is encouraged to participate.
Real issues are presented and are handled honestly. If people believe there are
hidden agendas, they are encouraged to bring comments into the open.
Only one issue or subject is handled at a time.
A solution is not reached until the problem has been adequately discussed and an-
alyzed. Premature motions divide the group and create artificial disagreements.
Decision making procedures are clear ahead of time. (Will we take a majority vote?
Will we reach consensus?)
The meetings leader shows no bias and encourages everyone to participate
All agreements made during the meeting are recapped at the end of the meeting.
GETTING YOURMEETING STARTED
1.
Arrange chairs to serve the goals of the meeting. Use a circle, semicircle, or
square arrangement so members can see each other. Try to keep away fromwin-
dows and doors to avoid distractions.
2.
Have paper, pencils, agendas, handouts, and a large calendar ready. Print the
goals for the meeting.
3.
Start on time. Announce your policy at the first meeting, and then keep to it.
4.
Agree on the ground rules. Is the group so large that members should rise when
speaking? Can members speak without raising their hands? Do facilitators pres-
ent their verbal contracts at the beginning of each meeting?What processes can
we use during what parts of meetings? Does everyone understand and agree to
such procedures?
5.
Listen to what is being said. If you perceive strong currents of disagreement or in-
decision, suggest compromises or appoint committees to report back with a plan.
6.
Above all, be well-informed about every topic on the agenda so you can ask ques-
tions and draw out information the group needs to make intelligent decisions.
MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES FORMEETING LEADERS
1.
Place yourself where everyone can see you.
2.
Be aware of how you present yourself. Your voice and posture indicate your confi-
dence. People respond to these things.
3.
Stay neutral. Do not allow put downs or asides among members. Be sure that all
comments are relevant to the topic.
4.
Do not let meetings drag. Stick to the agenda. Move business along when discus-
sion gets repetitious.
5.
Listen to what is being said. If you perceive strong currents of disagreement or in-
decision, suggest compromise or appoint committees to report back with a plan.
6.
Above all, be well-informed about every topic on the agenda so you can ask ques-
tions and draw out information the group needs to make intelligent decisions.
The meeting leader:
Knows all members by name, using place cards or name tags to help remember
Is at ease and comfortable in the position of leader
Is not too aggressive
Is a good communicator, speaking properly and effectively
Uses proper meeting procedures
Delegates to members special jobs
Ask members for opinions and ideas
Encourages discussion
Summarizes the discussion when necessary
Gives directions but does not dictate
Is not afraid to say, “I don’t know, but we’ll find out.”
Uses guides provided by the advisor.
FACILITATINGAMEETING
Much of the success of an effective meeting can be attributed to a leader who has
mastered skills of presiding. Keep these points in mind when presiding over a
meeting.
1.
Present the discussion as a quest rather than a debate. Everyone, including the
leader, should expect to come away from the meeting with more information than
he or she brought.
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